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Energy Trail

Follow the Warwick Energy Trail to learn more about the University’s world-class research and technology to meet the global energy challenge.

The Energy Trail covers 16 individual points of interest across campus. It follows a circular route and you can join it at any point. The full route is 5km. The shortened route is 1.5km.

The University is committed to meeting the global energy challenge through both reducing the energy needs of campus and also through developing world-leading energy research. A number of points on the energy trail highlight where the University is being used as a test bed for the development of new energy technologies.

Find out more about Warwick’s energy research

Quick links
Door button
The convector heater
Double doors
Lights
The lift
Glass roof
The speaker
Freezer
Glow in the dark signs
Lightning conductor
Electrical lights
Recycling
Double glazing
The chimney

Door button
For disabled visitors, this button activates a motor to open the doors. Electrical energy is converted into kinetic energy. (As well as some sound and heat.)

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Convector Heater
This is a convector heater. It draws cold air in at the bottom, heats it with electrical filaments and blows warm air out of the top. Electrical energy is converted into heat energy. There is also an electrical fan in there which converts electrical energy into kinetic (and sound) energy.

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Double Doors
These double doors are a sort of air lock. There should always be at least one door closed between the inside and the outside. This means that warm (expensively heated) air does not rush outside quite so quickly when people enter or leave the building.

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Lights
These lights convert electrical energy to light energy. The latest sort of lighting uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are much more efficient. This means that they waste very little energy as heat and so, for the same brightness as conventional bulbs, they are much cheaper to run.

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The lift
This lift has to convert electrical energy into kinetic energy to rise up to the first floor. On the way down, gravitational potential energy can be released and converted into kinetic energy. (The motors have to work like a brake to slow the lift down.)

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Glass roof
This glass roof means there is more natural light in the building during the day time. Also, as hot air rises, the windows at the very top of this structure can be opened to effectively cool the building.

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Speaker
This speaker converts electrical energy into sound energy.

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Freezer
This freezer has to use electrical energy to make a pump compress a gas inside a tube. When the pressure on the compressed gas is released , the temperature on the outside of the tube falls and the ice creams stay cold.

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Glow in the dark signs
By making these signs out of a material that can store light energy, they will glow in the dark. This means they do not need to use a bulb and batteries and people can find the fire extinguisher at night in an emergency.

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Lightning conductor
This is a lightning conductor. It can carry a huge amount of electrical energy safely down into the ground. If it was not able to do this, the building could catch fire if it was struck by lightning.

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Electrical lights
Electrical lights – purely for decoration they are only turned on when needed

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Recycling
Glass bottles being recycled. Although it takes energy to collect, melt and reform the bottles this takes less energy than making new glass from sand.

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Double glazing
Double glazed windows. These insulate the rooms from the cold outside in winter and reduce heating costs. Also, they insulate sound energy making the rooms inside more peaceful.

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The chimney
A chimney. Gas is being burned in a boiler to make hot water for heating and the kitchens and toilets.

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