Artists’ Pages

Quick Links


Big Takeaway, 2018

By Tom Waugh (Born 1978)
Doulting Stone
University of Warwick Art Collection

3b.jpg

Photo © Peter van den Berg, pjvdbphoto.com

Using traditional techniques Waugh has transformed this ancient stone, originating from the Jurassic period, into the image of a light, pliable, paper takeaway bag.

Echoing the carved drapery of antique statuary, he suggests not only the possible objects inside the bag but the folds and creases of its manufacture.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/tomwaugh/

back to top


Black Cube, 2013

By Lotte Thuenker (Born 1954)
Limestone Petit Granit
University of Warwick Art Collection

6b.jpg

Photo © Peter van den Berg, pjvdbphoto.com

Painstakingly hand carved, the striations that span the surfaces of Black Cube, provide the look of corduroy fabric. The form appears soft and stuffed, like a cushion or footstool.

On sitting upon Black Cube its failure to squash brings back an awareness of the true nature of the material and its transformation through carving.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/lottethuenker/

back to top


Concrete Country in Red, 2018

By Lucy Tomlins (Born 1979)
Corten and Mild Steel
University of Warwick Art Collection

2b.jpg

Sited on an ancient field boundary, this oversized stile acts as both a barrier and a gateway. It separates the busy main campus with its traffic from the quieter, rural spaces around the nearby residences. Created from steel, the work fuses an image of the countryside with the materials of the built environment.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/lucytomlins/

back to top


Days of Judgement, Cat 1, 2012

By Laura Ford (Born 1961)
Bronze
University of Warwick Art Collection

12b.jpg

The use of large-scale animal figures, or people dressed as animals, is a strong element in Laura Ford’s work; she uses these to create surreal and haunting representations of human emotions and frailties.

This sculpture is from Days of Judgement, a series of seven cat-figures anxiously pacing around, apparently gripped by dejection or remorse. The poses of the group were inspired by the figures of Adam and Eve in a fresco by the Renaissance artist Masaccio, The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, painted in 1427.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/lauraford/

back to top


Don’t Let Go, 2019

By Laura Ellen Bacon (born 1976)
Willow

website.jpg

This new sculpture is intended to provide, within its grooves and crevices, a habitat for insect life. Insects are a vital component in the biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems, playing a number of roles – from degrading or consuming leaves, wood, carrion and dung to dispersing fungi and providing an important food source for other animals. Laura Ellen Bacon describes her new work as resembling a ‘colony’ of life forms either clinging to and multiplying on the tree, or pouring from it. These forms may be interpreted as supportive, similarly to the tree’s own root structure; or as parasitic, such as a climbing vine or fungus. Overall these separate yet inter-connected forms provide a visual representation of the complexity of an ecosystem, within which destruction and decay is symbiotically linked with nutrition and procreation. This artwork, built around – yet separate to – a tree will in time degrade and decompose, a process supported by the insects currently living within it.

The artist’s work has been described as “monumental yet intimate”, “frenzied yet calm”, embrace, surround or engulf architectural and natural structures. Previously, her work has been seen in places such as Chatsworth, Somerset House, New Art Centre and Saatchi Gallery.

back to top


Forest Planet – 3, 2009; Forest 2011 – 2 Planet, 2011; Forest 2011 – 3 Planet, 2011

By Atsuo Okamoto (Born 1951)
Black basalt boulders
Gifts from the Artist
University of Warwick Art Collection

1b.jpg

Atsuo Okamoto’s work explores the properties of the stone with which he works and the way it changes over time.

The starting point for each of these three works was the drilling of holes into the boulders. This drilling is very precise and carefully calculated in order that each of the separate drill holes meet in the centre of the stone. The carving then continues around selected holes, producing pipe-like shapes. Okamoto believes that stones hold memories and often integrates sound into his sculptures to explore these ideas further.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/atsookamoto/

back to top


Hare, 2018

By Régis Chaperon (Born 1974)
Thala Stone
University of Warwick Art Collection

7b.jpg

Photo © Peter van den Berg, pjvdbphoto.com

Régis Chaperon presents us with the illusion of an Origami Hare. Origami is the ancient art of Japanese paper folding and comes from ‘ori’ meaning folding and ‘kami’ meaning paper

Chaperon’s shaping and choice of lines appear to be created through the creasing and folding a two dimensional material rather than through carving the solid block of Thala stone.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/regischaperon/

back to top


Needle of Knowledge Obelisk, 1993-94

By Stefan Knapp (1921-1996)
Enamel on steel and stainless steel
Donated by Eric and Jean Cass through the Contemporary Art Society, 2012
University of Warwick Art Collection

11b.jpg

Stefan Knapp was born in Bilgorj in Poland. He took up art as a means of dealing with the trauma of his experiences prior to and during the war. His formal art training was carried out at St Martin’s School of Art and the Slade School of Art.

For many of his major works Knapp’s medium was fired enamel on steel sheet, a technique which he spent years researching and developing. His work tends to be abstract, often influenced by natural, organic forms expressed in pure, bright colours.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/stefanknapp/

back to top


Our shadows alone touched you trying to find where here is, 2018

By John Newling
Commisioned from the Artist
University of Warwick Art Collection

A tree with a quote on it reading: "Our shadows alone touched you trying to find where here is"

John Newling has made many works that question what we value. In a series of letters to Nature, he suggests that we should try to find ‘here’ to understand what we now have in the natural world and how we might safeguard it. This work, commissioned by the University of Warwick Art Collection, is situated in a tree in the ancient oak woodland of Tocil Wood.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/johnnewling/

back to top


Reclining Stone, 2017

By Guy Stevens (Born 1971)
Ancaster Weatherbed Limestone
University of Warwick Art Collection

9b.jpg
Photo © Peter van den Berg, pjvdbphoto.com

Reclining Stone is a variation on the reclining figure in the history of art. It references the work of Henry Moore who used the reclining human form as a starting point for his large sculptures that became almost completely abstract.

The artist has carved the work so that the mineral variations in the stone highlight the head and knees.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/guystevens/

back to top


Song (Version V), 2017

By Jon Isherwood (Born 1960)
Black Granite
University of Warwick Art Collection

8b.jpg

Photo © Peter van den Berg, pjvdbphoto.com

This work has been created using digital cutting technology.

The narrowing and widening of the stripes make it seem as if the material of the sculpture has been stretched. It recalls black and white ‘Op Art’ prints made in the 1960s that aimed to deceive the viewer into thinking shapes were moving forwards and backwards.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/jonisherwood/

back to top


The Good and the Bad

By Jake and Dinos Chapman
Steel
The Good and The Bad by Jake and Dinos Chapman
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly is a group of three corten steel dinosaurs, each measuring more than eight metres in length and towering up to seven metres high. They resemble two huge children’s model-making kits and appear clumsy and lovable.

From October 2019, two of the three dinosaurs (The Good and The Bad) are on loan to the University of Warwick for one year only and form the focus of a new art and history trail leading across the campus.

Jake and Dinos Chapman are among the best known artists working today. They use material from a wide range of culture to challenge our ideas about past and present society and values.

back to top


3B Series 1, 1968

By Bernard Schottlander (1924-1999)
Painted steel
University of Warwick Art Collection

5b.jpg

Born in Germany, Schottlander came to Britain in 1939 and worked during the war as a welder. He later studied at the Central School of Arts and Crafts and set up his own workshop, becoming a full-time sculptor in 1963. This confident and colourful work was chosen to provide interest in the space between the austere glass and white tiled walls of the Rootes buildings. It is a purely abstract work, as underlined in its title, and utilises industrial materials and methods of production. The variety in the shape and disposition of its separate elements draws attention to the spaces they create and gives the sculpture an elegant and assertive presence in its location.

For further information, go to https://warwick.ac.uk/services/art/artist/bernardschottlander/

back to top