Room

Installation view, Heidi Bucher, Room, Sadie Coles HQ, London, 13 January – 18 February 2017 © the Estate of Heidi Bucher and Freymond-Guth Fine Arts, Zurich, courtesy the Swiss Institute, New York; courtesy Centre Culturel Suisse, Paris; courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

My Favourite Things...Herenzimmer

Posted by on

In our new series of interviews entitled ‘My Favourite Things…’ we talk to our team, students and audiences about their must see pieces of art, theatre, film or simply things they love about Warwick Arts Centre. First up, Karen Parker – one of our Mead Gallery assistants – who talks about her favourite piece in the Mead Gallery’s current exhibition, Room.

Herenzimmer is my favourite piece in Room at The Mead Gallery. I find the apparent solidity of the work at first glance intriguing, especially as it is subverted by the movement from any slight breeze as you walk past or open the gallery door. The walls hang delineating a space, but by hovering above the ground creates an ethereal, ghost-like presence that implies another world beyond. In one panel a door is ajar, inviting entry, but the fragile nature of the door itself demands a slow and careful negotiation. The skin of another room in another time and place provokes thoughts of what lay within that place and what may be here. For me the piece suggests a performance space and I am reminded of a Brechtian style set of a production of Kafka’s Metamorphosis I saw a few years ago. The organic nature of the latex walls, carrying an impression of hard edges and surfaces, suggest to me an old study with spiders scuttling and trapped flies pupating and hatching. As I enter through the doorway I feel sure I will see Gregor as creature escaping through the gaps in the panels.


Image credit:
Installation view, Heidi Bucher Room, Mead Gallery, 6 May – 24 June 2017. Untitled (Herrenzimmer)
1977-78
caoutchouc, mother of pearl pigments, gauze, bamboo
Installation approx. 303 × 463 × 425 cm / 119 ⅜ x 182 ¼ x 167 ⅜ in
HQ20-HB12685S / BUCH_003733.3
Photography by Francis Ware

blog comments powered by Disqus